Tag Archives: Gene Veith

Avoiding Lopsided Vocationalism

This is the final post of a three-part essay on the vocation of a student.

What we have examined so far is that college students are first and foremost called to study; this is directly implied in the title “student.” Yet, college students arrive on the doorstep of the university already having grabbed hold of multiple vocations. They have families with whom they are very involved. They have jobs that provide them the ability to pay for some of their daily needs. They have friends that mean more to them than many in older generations can imagine. Many of these students participate in sports and athletic endeavors, and are highly loyal to those social organizations. In other words, even as students arrive at college, they are loaded down with multiple responsibilities that will, inevitably, influence their academic pursuits.

Often times, these pursuits will come into conflict. Continue reading Avoiding Lopsided Vocationalism

What Does It Mean to Be a Student?

This is the first post of a three-part essay on the vocation of a student.

What does it mean to be a student? Several responses can be given to this simple, yet complex, question. The place to begin with is the observation that to be a student—like to be a daughter or a son, brother or sister, friend or citizen—is to have a vocation. This is apparent in the fact that a university has accepted a person’s application for enrollment. In doing so the university calls the applicant, placing upon her the honorable and holy vocation of student.

It might sound strange to say that being a student is honorable and holy, but it is. It is much more than, as many people think, a path to a profession or financial well-being. Continue reading What Does It Mean to Be a Student?