Tag Archives: Leonardo

Painting, the Liberal Arts, and the Great Conversation, Part III

Mona Lisa by Leonardo
Mona Lisa by Leonardo

This is the third and final post by an art historian, art critic, and curator on the role of the visual arts in the liberal arts curriculum.

Most of what we know of Leonardo’s creative, scientific, and imaginative work we known from his notebooks. Over 6,000 sheets of notes and drawings reveal his in-depth explorations of architecture, geometry, geology, astronomy, engineering, hydraulics, anatomy, sculpture, and of course painting.  Surprisingly, it appears that these 6,000 sheets represent as little as one-fifth of what he actually produced. Continue reading Painting, the Liberal Arts, and the Great Conversation, Part III

Painting, the Liberal Arts, and the Great Conversation, Part II

Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi
Portrait of Leonardo by Francesco Melzi

This is the second in a series of posts by an art historian, art critic, and curator on the role of the visual arts in the liberal arts curriculum.

I have been thinking a lot about Leonardo da Vinci. In May I taught a three-week course in Florence, Italy with a political science professor called Machiavelli, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Birth of the Modern. Continue reading Painting, the Liberal Arts, and the Great Conversation, Part II